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TURDA SALT MINE-ALBA CAROLINA CITADEL-SIBIU CITY

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DESCRIPTION
Itinerary
  • Meeting at 08.00 a.m. with the English speaking guide.
  • Drive from Cluj Napoca to Turda having the first stop for the visit at the Salt Mine.
  • "Salina Turda" is a salt mine in the Durgău-Valea Sărată area of Turda, the second largest city in Cluj County, Romania. Opened for tourists in 1992, the Salina Turda was visited by about 618,000 Romanian and foreign tourists just in 2017. Salina Turda was ranked among the "25 hidden gems around the world that are worth the trek". Salt was first extracted here during the antiquity and the mine continuously produced table salt from the Middle Ages, the mine being first mentioned in 1075, to the early–20th century (1932).The first document that speaks explicitly about the existence of a salt mine in Turda dates from 1 May 1271, being issued by the Hungarian chancellery. Documents preserved from the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries that refer to the Turda salt mines mention that salines were arranged in Băile Sărate microdepression and on the south-eastern slope of the Valea Sărată. Operating rooms were placed on the sites of current salt lakes from the perimeters mentioned above. In the seventeenth century has begun first salt mining works on the north-western slope of Valea Valea Sărată, evidenced by shafts in the dome of Terezia room. Shortly after, the Sfântul Anton mine was opened, where mining activity continued until the first half of the twentieth century.
  • Our next stop will be Alba Carolina Citadel.
  • Alba Iulia is the seat of Alba County in the west-central part of Romania. Located on the Mureș River in the historical region of Transylvania. Since the High Middle Ages, the city has been the seat of Transylvania's Roman Catholic diocese. Between 1541 and 1690 it was the capital of the Eastern Hungarian Kingdom and the latter Principality of Transylvania. At one point it also was a center of Eastern Orthodox Metropolitan of Transylvania with suffragan to Vad diocese. Alba Iulia is historically important for Romanians, Hungarians, and Transylvanian Saxons. In December 2018, Alba Iulia was officially declared Capital of the Great Union of Romania. The modern city is located near the site of the important Dacian political, economic and social centre of Apulon, which was mentioned by the ancient Greek geographer Ptolemy and believed by some archaeologists to be the Dacian fortifications on top of Piatra Craivii. After Dacia became a province of the Roman Empire, the capital of Dacia Apulensis was established here, and the city was known as Apulum. Apulum was the largest city in Roman Dacia and was the seat of the XIII Gemina Legion. Apulum is the largest castrum located in Romania, occupying 37.5 hectares (93 acres) (750 x 500 m2).
  • Our next stop will be in Sibiu City Center.
  • Sibiu ( Hermannstadt ) is one of the most important cultural centres of Romania and was designated the European Capital of Culture for the year 2007, along with the city of Luxembourg.[3] Formerly the centre of the Transylvanian Saxons, the old city of Sibiu was ranked as "Europe's 8th-most idyllic place to live" by Forbes in 2008.The town was founded by Géza II of Hungary, who later settled Saxons there. The first official record referring to the Sibiu area comes from 1191, when Pope Celestine III confirmed the existence of the free prepositure of the Saxons in Transylvania, the prepositure having its headquarters in Sibiu, named Cipin at that time. Later the permament Latin refence to the city was Cibinium. In the 14th century, it was already an important trade centre. In 1376, the craftsmen were divided in 19 guilds. Sibiu became the most important ethnic German city among the seven cities that gave Transylvania its German name Siebenbürgen (literally seven citadels). It was home to the Universitas Saxorum (Community of the Saxons), a network of pedagogues, ministers, intellectuals, city officials, and councilmen of the German community forging an ordered legal corpus and political system in Transylvania since the 1400s. During the 18th and 19th centuries, the city became the second- and later the first-most important centre of Transylvanian Romanian ethnics. The first Romanian-owned bank had its headquarters here (The Albina Bank), as did the ASTRA (Transylvanian Association for Romanian Literature and Romanian's People Culture). After the Romanian Orthodox Church was granted status in the Habsburg Empire from the 1860s onwards, Sibiu became the Metropolitan seat, and the city is still regarded as the third-most important centre of the Romanian Orthodox Church. Between the Hungarian Revolution of 1848 and 1867 (the year of the Ausgleich), Sibiu was the meeting-place of the Transylvanian Diet, which had taken its most representative form after the Empire agreed to extend voting rights in the region. After World War I, when Austria-Hungary was dissolved, Sibiu became part of Romania; the majority of its population was still ethnic German (until 1941) and counted a large Romanian community, as well as a smaller Hungarian one. Starting from the 1950s and until after 1990, most of the city's ethnic Germans emigrated to Germany and Austria. Among the roughly 2,000 who have remained is Klaus Johannis, the current President of Romania.
  • After a short break we will drive back to Cluj Napoca .
Included in the price
  • Transport by modern car
  • Professional guide assistance during the whole trip.
  • City tour in each city in the trip.
Not included in the price
  • Rate is valid for groups of minimum 2 persons.
  • For over 10 persons important discount will be applied.
  • Entrance tickets for touristy attractions
  • Lunch, Dinner or any other meals
REVIEWS
- 1 January 1970
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RATES
  • Tour rate: 65 €/person
  • Credit Card accepted (Visa and Mastercard, the transaction requires the PIN code)

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